Friday, July 21, 2017

Reviewing: Home All Along

Home All Along (An Amish Secrets Novel) by [Wiseman, Beth]
Home All Along ,Book 3 in the Amish Secret Series  by Beth Wiseman is not your typical novel about an Englisher living among the Amish. Charlotte has made a home for herself in her late brother Ethan's house.  It is quite a change from her first visit, posing as an Amish woman searching for answers about Ethan's death.

Life has had far too many ups and downs for such a young woman.
As a child she and Ethan lived in foster homes with time off to be returned home now and then when their parents were released from rehab or jail.  And now, she just wants to live quietly, join the church and marry Daniel.   The past, however, has a way of stirring things up. For Charlotte, the past included a sister she hadn't thought of for a very long time.  As a baby, Charlotte's sister Andrea was also placed in foster care but never saw her family again. Until, that is, when she tracked Charlotte down at their mother's funeral. It didn't take long for her to get herself moved in with Charlotte, along with her baby.  For Charlotte, having her family near was a blessing and she was determined to make them a home together.

In the beginning, it seems the book is about Charlotte and Daniel's love for each other.  It is more than that, however, as three families grapple with love, death, illness and how difficult it is to understand God's will under the modern marvels of medicine.  The questions Beth Wiseman raises in this novel are complex. I liked how the decisions were made. Sometimes we need someone to nearly hit us with a two by four to wake us up about putting others needs before our desires.

Daniel family struggles with major family decisions.  He loves Charlotte but is pulling away from her. Charlotte's beloved friend and motherly mentor Lena faces yet another bout of breast cancer. Andrea is slowly learning from Charlotte's love that life can be different.  So many trials are faced in this book yet through it all. Is there enough faith and love for Charlotte and her Daniel to marry?  This book is for readers who are looking for characters who are resilient and not willing to give up when life gets hard.  Once again, Beth Wiseman has delivered!

Saturday, July 15, 2017

Reviewing: A Letter from Lancaster County

Second chances don't come along often and if we miss them, regret can linger like moss on the roof. Always lurking above as a reminder.  A letter written
A Letter from Lancaster County (Lancaster Discoveries Book 1) by [Lloyd, Kate]with hope to repair the past brings two sisters to Lancaster County to visit their mother's sister. Their memories of Aunt Sylvia are barely visible yet something stirs Angela's heart to make the journey with her sister Rose.  Memories of their mother linger within the walls of  Sylvia's home. This is the home where their  grandparents lived and raised their family.  

Within the coves of A Letter from Lancaster County, Kate Lloyd skillfully writes of the journey begun with duty and spite. Angela and Rose grew up in the same house yet are worlds apart. Angela is married to a successful attorney and her two children are of a certain age where they no longer need their doting mother managing their busy schedules.  Rose is single, owns her own business and pinches pennies.  

The simplicity of Sylvia's life seems to be at the center of the story, yet the author wrote the story from the perspective of Rose and Angela. Chapter by chapter, the events of this short trip to Lancaster County unfold through the eyes of each woman.  Their lives seem to parallel the lives of their aunt and their mother. 

Sylvia's health is failing and the letter she wrote to her nieces was written with fervent hope to repair past tensions she had with her own sister. She is a delightful woman and it is through her quiet wisdom that she lets her nieces alone to discover what she had lost with her own sister.  The past is a good teacher and regret can lead to bitterness.  

Finding a photograph with their mother and Sylvia triggers a change that opens their hearts stirring a change within Angela and Rose.  It is as though they were awakened to how they could change their lives to what was meant to be. We are rarely granted a glimpse into the lives of our mothers as young women.  We think of them as mother, not a young woman who had dreams.  Angela and Rose came to visit their aunt out of duty.  They would choose a memento from the family home and go back to their lives in Seattle.  Or would they?  

As I read this book I thought of how life can be so different for people who were raised the same within the walls of the same home.  One daughter does exactly what is expected and the other is bent on carving her niche in her own way.  One can't help but wonder what causes this and yet for my own part, I had five brothers and five sisters growing up.  It amazes me how we can each remember an event so differently.

As I read the book I was taken in by both Rose and Angela. I felt I was with them on this journey, a reminder of trips I have taken with my own sisters.  This is a book worth adding to your collection. The simplicity of Sylvia's life and how she quietly accepts her nieces, each for who she is is wonderful!  



Saturday, July 8, 2017

Reviewing: Gladden the Heart by Olivia Newport

Gladden the Heart (Amish Turns of Time Book 5) by [Newport, Olivia]Gladden the Heart  by Olivia Newport, gives us a glimpse of the revivalism movement in America in 1847.  When our story begins, Susanna Hooley is gathering roots and wildflowers to create dyes for fabric.  In the clearing is a large tent for one of Reverend Braxton's revival meetings.  The hot July afternoon brought a large crowd to hear her friend Patsy's father preaching a powerful message. Susanna's Amish community was not immune to the impassioned messages that poured from the good reverend's tongue. Such things were not heard in the long three hour meetings she experienced every other Sunday. Intrigued by what she heard, coupled with seeing so many Amish from her district, she steeled herself away.

Not long after this, however, her life is turned upside down by her cousin Noah. During a normal conversation on an ordinary Sunday afternoon, he fell under a spell.  The normally quiet man began to preach from the book of John.  His message was so powerful and strong, many gathered to hear, including the bishop.  The bishop fully believes that Noah is wakeful and willful with his preaching and orders him to stop. Noah was unaware that he gave such stirring sermons straight from the bible. When he woke from his trances he was exhausted and slept for hours.

It isn't long before Susanna discovers Noah's unpredictable behavior has happened before.   She is determined to help Noah's wife Phoebe keep him safe, disregarding opinions from her mother, the bishop and even Adam Yotter, her intended.  The situation becomes a controversy as many in the community begin congregating at Noah's house daily to hear him preach.  It is only when a near tragedy occurs that Susanna, Adam, his uncle and the bishop come together to help Noah and find common ground. 

I enjoyed this book.  Many people were yearning for meaningful spiritual experiences they didn't find in their usual long, dry services.  A powerful message such as those delivered under the big tent seemed to offer more.  While traditional clergy may have argued that nobody could gauge a true enlightened experience, I disagree. How can anyone know what another truly experiences.  The human experience is amazing and sometimes the true picture cannot be told by looking at someone.  The sleeping preacher phenomenon was real, something I was unaware of.  In the midst of this time in America, great changes were taking place. It is ironic that even the Amish, who lived separate from others would experience such things. Enlightening.  

Sunday, July 2, 2017

Under A Summer Sky (Follow Your Heart Book 3) by Melody Carlson

Under a Summer Sky (Follow Your Heart): A Savannah Romance by [Carlson, Melody]Melody Carlson is a writer for all seasons.  Under A Summer Sky is a wonderful addition for summer reading.  Travel first class to Savanna this Summer!  Vicariously, of course with Nicole Anderson, who leaves her Seattle home to manage an art gallery for an old family friend.  The gallery is owned by Vivian Graham, her mother's best friend through school.  While growing up, summer vacations were often spent with the Graham family. Nicole and her sister Kate spent a lot of time with the sons Alex and Ryan.

Arriving in Savanna, Nicole finds she is one step ahead of her old life as a high school art teacher. Staying in the Graham home for the summer home is a dream and when she steps into the gallery she feels like she has stepped into her true calling.  Except, of course, for her snarky coworker, Amyra, an unhappy woman who seems willing to go the extra mile to make things unpleasant.  Determined to make things work, Nicole maintains a positive attitude under pressure and begins to find her niche in the gallery business. It doesn't take long for her to put her own successful stamp on the business.

Nicole presents a positive impact on a situation that could be tough. I found her character admirable.  About the second night of her stay she heard unmistakable noises from the attic.  She called on Ryan to help her investigate only to find Alex's daughter Bernie camping out in protest to her parents pending divorce.  With great aplomb, our heroine embraces the girl in a positive way by allowing her to stay in the home and mentoring her at the gallery.   The way the author characterized Nicole makes her such a good role model for the other young women in the story.

As a single woman, of course there is romance for Nicole and I went back and forth on who I wanted her to choose in the end.  The handsome Alex, who she secretly had a crush on as a teen or younger brother Ryan, the former nerd, who may be more than meets the eye.  Melody Carlson once again played this well and I liked the ending very much.

Savanna in the summer, romance, patience and finding your true calling are woven together in this wonderful summer novel.  I recommend it as an addition to any beach bag or perhaps in that carry on bag you'll stow under your seat as you fly away for your summer vacation!

Sunday, June 25, 2017

Reviewing: My Heart Belongs on Mackinac Island

Now and then I read a book that just says summer is here! I recently finished reading My Heart Belongs on Mackinac Island Maude's Mooring: by Carrie Fancett Pagels and this is just such a book.

My Heart Belongs on Mackinac Island: Maude's Mooring by [Pagels, Carrie Fancett]
Maude Welling is a lovely young woman, considered by fellow islanders to be the best sort of girl.  She is unspoiled by the things most girls visiting the island long for.  Her desire is to marry Greyson, her long time intended, and run the family inn.  Fate, however unkind, intervenes and Maude is left at the pier to watch in horror as Greyson introduces Maude to Ann, his new wife.

Enter Mr. Frederic Konig, a handsome young man who is a very wealthy industrialist, witnessing the entire scene between Maude, Greyson and Ann.  He was taken in by her hurt manner, but even more so by  her beauty and grace.

Mr. Konig will be staying at the very smart Grand Hotel, the very best place on the island to find wealthy young women. Frederic, though, is an imposter. He is not who he says he is. He is actually Ben Steffan, a young reporter for the Detroit Post.  He was furnished in the finest men's fashions, schooled in the proper etiquette of wealth and, more specifically, on special assignment to expose handsome young dandies who prey on lovely young women of fortune. He can fool the many but in his heart he knows who he is.   A man of compassion, he feels like he is playing a game of the Prince and the Pauper.  His dress and actions speak the part but his good nature continues to shine through.  Mark Twain himself appears at the Grand, a nice touch of poetic license that adds just the right spice for Ben when he needed it.

Maude lives with her widowed father and lively brother Jack.  She should be learning to take over the family inn, The Winds of Mackinac, but her father's wishes are adamant: she will not run the inn without the help of a husband.  With her wedding plans down the pipe she is determined to prove to her father that she is capable of running the inn.  She assumes the role of maid at the Grand Hotel, fooling her father but risking termination by  her lack of skills.

Frederic takes an interest in Jack, an incorrigible lad who seems to be everywhere at once with many plans up his sleeve.  He and his games are incorrigible.  Jack is running so much it is hard to realize that if he slowed down he'd have to deal that old pain that keeps rising to the surface named grief. The Wellings lost their mother the year before and the grief is still hanging around the house like an unsung song.

Maude, her father and uncle Robert all have to come to an understanding of the future of the inn.  Wills are meant to make things easier for loved ones left behind but once in a great while, a codicil can change the expectations of everyone.  There is more riding on the fate of this will than just a family legacy on the island.
I liked the story.  The setting on Mackinac Island lent itself well to the summer people who likely found respite from the city during the heat of the summer.  Young women of marriageable age would have enjoyed being pampered at the Grand Hotel.  The idea that a paper would set a handsome young reporter on unsuspecting gold diggers was a nice twist.  It lured me in like a fisherman with a tall tale.  I recommend you add My Heart Belongs on Mackinac Island to your summer reading list!

Sunday, June 18, 2017

Reviewing: Naomi's Hope by Jan Drexler

Naomi's Hope is book three in Jan Drexler's Journey to Pleasant Prairie series.  I have enjoyed this series from the start of the journey along the Conestoga Creek through to arriving after many trials to their land in La Grange County, Indiana in 1843. Three years have passed and the community that started as a dream is now settling into permanent homes.  Families are thriving, crops are plentiful and there is peace among their new church district and it continues to grow.

Naomi Schrock has raised her adopted seven-year old Davey for three years.  They found him, the lone survivor of a Tornado hiding inside a large fireplace.  The storm killed his parents and baby sister and raised the house and farm to rubble.  Single and likely to remain so, Naomi loves and dotes on Davey.

Cap Stoltzfus moved to the area for a fresh start. He lost both his wife and son in childbirth seven years ago and is determined to break free of his grief.  By chance, Christian Yoder drops by the clearing where Cap is building his home alone.  It doesn't take long for Christian to size things up and organize a house raising.  The work of many hands quickly builds the sides and roof of his home.  Overwhelmed by the generosity of his new neighbors Cap quickly becomes one of their own.

 Davey found Cap first, quite by accident simply by being a curious boy of seven.  Their farms are adjacent and it's not long before Davey wore a path is to Cap's. Both are taken with each other and develop a special bond.  Naomi and Cap, through Davey, spend time together, developing feelings for one another.  Could they possibly become a family?

Naomi's Hope (Journey to Pleasant Prairie Book #3) by [Drexler, Jan]This is a story of strength, courage and forgiveness.  When community warmly welcomed Cap, they also welcomed Shem Fischer, a minister from Canada to the area.  Shem is agreeable, seemingly devout and insinuates himself comfortably among the people.  Cap is wary, having known Shem under different circumstances growing up.  Before long, there is rising mistrust that threatens to splinter the community.  It takes courage and strength to rise above strife.

Davey is central to the story, tying so many facets together. Young and innocent, his strongest desire is to have a family.  His story will win your heart as he weaves into and out of mishaps. My heart was warmed by this special young man and the love he truly brings to his family.  I heartily recommend this book.  I have grown fond of the characters in this series. I admire the strength and courage they had to move from their homes and travel to a new land only to start over.

"Jan Drexler brings a unique understanding of Amish traditions and beliefs to her writing. Her ancestors were among the first Amish, Mennonite, and Brethren immigrants to Pennsylvania in the 1700s, and their experiences are the basis for her stories. Jan lives in South Dakota with her husband, their four adult children, two active dogs, and a cat. She is the author of The Prodigal Son Returns, A Mother for His Children (winner of the 2013 TARA award), and A Home for His Family (finalist for the 2016 Inspirational Reader's Choice Award), as well as Hannah's Choice and Mattie's Pledge."- Amazon


Sunday, June 11, 2017

Reviewing: The Farmer's Market Mishap


Meet identical twins Thelma and Elma!  I was introduced to them when I read The Lopsided Christmas Cake by Wanda E Brunstetter and Jean Brunstetter. When a buggy accident claimed the lives of their grandparents, the twins inherited a home and store in Topeka Illinois. Moving from Sullivan  to Topeka was not easy and they found their new home was not as ship shape as they remembered from childhood visits.  Hard work and faith carries the girls through each challenge.  The Lopsided Christmas Cake  is a lively story of their coming of age.

The Farmer's Market Mishap centers on Elma and Ben Wagler who it would seem couldn't possibly get together.  Imagine being of marrying age and just not finding the right mate yet matchmakers seem determined to pair you up with unsuitable matches. Elma feels destined to be an old spinster running her store alone after the recent marriage of Thelma to Joseph.  Even though their home is across the street she misses the close companionship she felt with her twin.
Ben has been living with his mother on the family farm since his father passed.  A farrier by trade, his life seems to be too busy to court the young woman his mother has "chosen" for him. He's met every other eligible young lady in his community and feels destined to carry out his life without a wife.

A chance meeting at the farmer's market in Shipshewana sends sparks to both Ben and Elma.  The spark kindled by this encounter leaves a lasting impression on both their hearts but she lives in Topeka and he lives in Grabill.  50 miles is a bit far apart to begin a courtship for this Amish couple!  What of Ben's mother, Dorothy, who couldn't live alone, or the store, or Thelma's new baby?  How can these two get together when distance and family obligations threaten to keep them apart?


This story is light-hearted and heartwarming.  I recommend The Farmer's Market Mishap for anyone who enjoys Wanda Brunstetter's legacy of Amish fiction.



Tuesday, June 6, 2017

An Interview with Author Jody Hedlund

Jody Hedlund's Profile Photo, Image may contain: 1 personI am excited to welcome Inspirational Author Jody Hedlund. I asked her to join me to answer a few questions about her latest book, With You Always releases today. With You Always is the first book in the new Orphan Train series.  


What is the inspiration behind your new Orphan Train series?

I have long been fascinated by the era of the Orphan Trains and the heart-wrenching stories of the homeless and helpless young orphans that were taken from the streets of New York City and other eastern cities and shipped West by the dozens. I was familiar with stories of those scared orphans who were placed out in what was thought to be a more wholesome, healthy environment of the newly settled Mid-Western states. Some of the orphans found happy endings and were adopted into loving families. Others experienced great abuse and heartache in their new homes.

While stories of the orphans who rode the trains have been told—and rightly so—the stories of the women who were involved in the movement are not as well known. One of the things I particularly like to do when telling my stories, is focus on women who have been overlooked by the pages of history. I consider it a great privilege to be able to bring forgotten women to life for our modern generation. Thus, throughout this series, I’ll be focusing each book on a different aspect of the Orphan Train movement, particularly from the perspective of women who experienced riding the trains in one form or another.

How did you come up with the idea for the first book in the series, With You Always?

For this first book in the series, I decided to base the story around the placing out of women that happened in 1857 as a result of a financial crisis and economic panic in the autumn of that year. Women laborers were already at a disadvantage with poor working conditions and low wages. In September of 1857, estimates of New York unemployment ran as high as forty percent. Female employment was cut by almost half. With prostitution already a main source of income for many women, the recession drove even more to desperate measures and the number of women in prison rose as well.

To meet the growing crisis, the Children’s Aid Society in New York, along with organizations in other cities, who were already sending children West, decided to set up special placement offices to find jobs for seamstresses and trade girls in the West. The associations only wanted women of “good character” and they were required to provide references. If the women met the qualifications, then they were sent on trains to towns in Mid-Western states, particularly central Illinois where the demand for cheap labor was prevalent. They were presented to western employers as “helpless females left without the means of support.” Placement of these women continued until the spring of 1858.

It was my hope through the first book in the series, With You Always, to give readers a glimpse into the disadvantage of women during this particular era by showing the heroine Elise Neumann’s struggle, first in New York City and then also the continued heartache and problems that arose after leaving her family behind so that she could attempt to start a new life in central Illinois.

What special research did you do in writing With You Always?

In the beginning phases of writing this series, I did a great deal of reading about the orphan train movement. In particular, I really loved Stephen O’Conor’s book, Orphan Trains, because he includes so many personal stories and details about real orphans, which are heart wrenching.

I also read, A History of New York City to 1898, by Burrows and Wallace, which gave me great insights into the lives of immigrants, particularly immigrant women. Masses of foreigners were arriving into New York City on a daily basis, and the book gave a detailed look into their pathetic housing situation, the difficult working conditions, as well as gang problems and the underworld.
Finally, another important aspect of the story that required a concentrated amount of research was the development of railroads. The mid-1800’s was an incredible period of growth for the railroad industry in the Mid-West. The new railroads aided the orphan train movement but also brought about the settlement of the Midwestern states, including Illinois, which is one of the settings of the book.

What do you hope readers take away from With You Always?

One of my hopes in telling this story is to leave readers with the reminder that God is walking with us in whatever dark valley we’re going through. Often, like Elise, we tend to pull away from God and let the bitterness of our circumstances drive us into a cave of isolation and self-blame and heartache. But God wants us to realize that even if we pull away from Him, He’s still there walking by our side, waiting for us to reach out our hand and grab ahold of Him. He never leaves us or forsakes us. He’s there waiting.

With You Always is the third book you’ve released in 2017.  How do you find time to write so many books?

I keep a very rigorous writing schedule, usually writing six days a week. I give myself a challenging word count goal—a certain number of words to write every day. Then, in the morning, I sit down and write until I meet my goals. It’s as simple . . . and as hard as that!

I like to compare being an author to a marathon runner. The person training to run a marathon doesn’t start off running twenty-six miles the first time she runs. Instead she begins with just a few miles, strengthens her muscles, builds her endurance, and slowly adds more miles.

Writing is the same way. Over the years, I’ve strengthened my writing muscles and built up my endurance so that now I can write faster and for longer stretches.

What are you working on next?

The second book in the orphan train series releases next summer in 2018. The story continues with Marianne Neumann. She gets involved in the orphan train movement as one of the placing agents and accompanies the orphans as they ride the trains west. I hope readers will enjoy Marianne’s story and also appreciate learning more about the orphan train movement from the eyes of the compassionate workers who tried to place the orphans into new homes.

 Do you have any parting words?

I love hearing from readers! Make sure you stop by one of these places and say hello!
I hang out on Facebook here: Author Jody Hedlund
I also love to chat on Twitter: @JodyHedlund
My home base is at my website: jodyhedlund.com
Find me on Instagram: instagram.com/jodyhedlund/

Come pin with me on Pinterest: pinterest.com/jodyhedlund/pins/

Thank you for stopping by Jody!  Please visit one of the places and say hello to Jody.  I recommend this book and already look forward to the second book.  Check out my review!

Monday, May 29, 2017

Take a Chance On A Love So True

A Love So True (Teaville Moral Society Book #2) by [Jagears, Melissa]A Love so True by Melissa Jagears is a welcome addition to the Teaville Moral Society collection.  In Southeast Kansas, circa 1908, a young man named David Kingsman arrived at A.K. Glass factory by his father.  Always ready to turn a profit, David's father wanted him to get that factory ready to sell. Instead, David fired two "key" employees who Loafed on the job and settled in to make necessary changes to the factory.  Hoping to impress a difficult to please father, David sees potential in the business that may prove it worthwhile for the family business to invest in this factory and the city.

Evelyn Wisely is a young woman dedicated to the orphans in Teaville.   Children  of the local soiled doves lived in the orphanage started by Lydia and Nicholas Lowe.  Housed in a mansion Nicholas built, the children thrive under Evelyn's care with the help of her parents, .....not content to house only these orphans, she visits other children on Saturdays to give them a much needed warm lunch to eat with a meaningful bible story.  She was determined to feed their souls along with their bodies.  It never seemed enough, however, to serve these children.  She wanted to serve their mothers by helping them improve their lives by leaving the dreaded profession of prostitution.

It takes one person to convince another to make a change in society.  Caring for the unloved and getting others to see them as God's creation is no small feat. The perseverance and dedication to bring these unloved women and children out of such a deplorable lifestyle was an amazing fight that I don't know I possess.  While this is fiction, the implications of the impact on those who did fight to make changes for the desperate women who were plunged low to a life of prostitution and alcohol were phenomenal.  The children who were left in the wake of that lifestyle were left to fend for themselves.  This is a difficult topic and Melissa Jagears engaged this reader's awareness in the midst of a wonderful novel.

Evelyn and David develop a high regard for one another as the book tackles obstacles they must each overcome in order to be free to fall in love. There is so much more inside the pages of this book than a simple love story. I recommend this book with warmth for your summer reading pleasure.

Sunday, May 21, 2017

Take A Ride on the Illinois Central When You Read "With You Always " by Jody Hedlund


With You Always (Orphan Train Book #1) by Jody Hedlund is a very compelling book that will keep you going from the streets of New York to Quincy, Illinois.  This is a story about a young woman overcoming great odds and emerging as a leader among some of the poorest of  her time.  
The Neumann sisters, Elise, Marianne and Sophie lost both parents after emigrating to America. Life became just struggle after struggle for them. After the Financial Panic of 1857, Elise made the difficult decision to sign up with the Children's Aid Society, a group that worked under contract with many employers to offer women of good moral character employment opportunities. She left behind her sisters and two young orphan charges at a shelter in New York.  She reasoned they would all be reunited once she could save for their fares to Illinois.

This books is written about a time when so many immigrant women and children bore the brunt of poverty.  Poor working and living conditions made their plight deplorable.  An opportunity such as Elise seized, was a ticket out of poverty if she could earn enough to pay back her train fare, living expenses and other costs of employment incurred.  
With You Always (Orphan Train Book #1) by [Hedlund, Jody]  Along the journey to Quincy Illinois she encounters Thornton, a man she briefly met in New York.   He is handsome, attentive and takes her to dine at places she's only dreamt of. World's apart, and unknown to her at the time, he is the son of a wealthy man from New York. Along with his twin, he is racing to build a community along the Illinois Central Line, competing for the legacy of their dying father.  His job is to build that city and marry a woman he loves within six months!

While building the community in our story, Thornton discovers through Elise that under the facade of paperwork compiled by his assistant, there is real work for him to do.  Ledgers often tell a different story than what is beyond an office door.   Construction workers or Laundresses are much more than entries on a payroll list. What happens to Thornton as he really begins to build the community of Quincy Illinois is an uplifting transformation.  He deserves to be cheered on no matter who wins his father's competition if only for his willingness to learn from those who he worked shoulder to shoulder with.

I heartily recommend this book for so many reasons.  While fiction, it brings to life the colorful people who had the faith and courage to leave the comfort of what was known for the unknown in hopes it was ever so much better for their families.  Historical fiction such as this, written by Jody Hedlund is a catalyst for the reader to enjoy romantic fiction while spurring the desire to learn one more way just how our vast country was settled. A remarkable read, With You Always is a memorable story to read, and read yet again. Available June 6th, 2017 at your favorite booksellers.